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transsamwinchester:

transsamwinchester:

please watch this cat talking to her babies

if any of my posts deserved to get a lot of notes its this one

(via yazpanda)

Source: transsamwinchester
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georgetakei:

Getting to the groot of the issue. (Another generation test…)

Source: OhMyy Community Page

Source: georgetakei
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sacred-soil:

/pet

I am just going to run around the Goblet and pet all the mankitties…

(via mikael-natherion)

Source: sacred-soil
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koyomatsu:

totemo-kawaii—ne:

The kimono must be tied with the right side on the inside.

  • Kimono (着物) is the famous traditional dress of Japan.
  • There are many different types of kimono furisode*, haori* and hakama*.
  • The most glamorous of these is the colorfully patterned women’s kimono.
  • The kimono is a rectilinear dress made with sewn strips of cloth, but when worn and tied with a rope and obi*, it curves nicely around the body.
  • When putting on the kimono, the right side is folded underneath, closer to the skin. The left side is only folded below when dressing persons who have died, and doing so in daily life is thought to be a bad omen.
  • Because kimono are expensive, restrict the range of motion, and take a long time to put on, most Japanese people wear western-style clothing in their daily lives.
  • However, children and young people can be seen wearing kimono during special occasions like shichi-go-san*, the Coming-of-Age Day*, and weddings.

[Click the bold / underlined word for an example photo]

*furisode: (振袖) a style of kimono distinguishable by its long sleeves, which range in length from 85 centimeters (2’8 ft.] for a kofurisode (小振袖) to 114 centimeters [3’6 ft.] for an ōfurisode (大振袖). Furisode are the most formal style of kimono worn by unmarried women in Japan.The furisode is made of very fine, brightly colored silk, and is commonly rented or bought by parents for their daughters to wear when celebrating Coming of Age Day the year they turn 20. By wearing a furisode, a young woman signifies that she is both single and a legal adult, and thus available for marriage. In this sense, a furisode might be likened to the formal gowns worn by debutantes in the West. The furisode is generally worn for formal social functions such as the tea ceremony or wedding ceremonies of relatives. Since furisodes can be quite expensive, many women rent them as needed rather than purchasing them.

*haoritraditional jacket worn over a kimono.

*hakama: (袴) originally worn only by men, but today they are worn by both sexes. Hakama are tied at the waist and fall approximately to the ankles. Hakama are worn over a kimono. There are two types of hakama, divided umanori (馬乗り) and undivided andon bakama (行灯袴). The umanori type have divided legs, similar to trousers. Hakama are secured by four straps (himo); two longer himo attached on either side of the front of the garment, and two shorter himo attached on either side of the rear. The rear of the garment has a rigid trapezoidal section, called a koshi-ita (腰板). Below that on the inside is a hakama-dome (袴止め) which is tucked into the obi or himo at the rear, and helps to keep the hakama in place. Hakama have seven deep pleats, two on the back and five on the front. The pleats are said to represent the seven virtues of bushido, considered essential to the samurai way. Although they appear balanced, the arrangement of the front pleats, (three to the right, two to the left) is asymmetrical, and as such is an example of asymmetry in Japanese aesthetics.

*obi: (帯, おび) a sash for traditional Japanese dress, keikogi worn for Japanese martial arts, and part of kimono outfits.

*shichi-go-san(七五三, literally “Seven-Five-Three”) a traditional rite of passage and festival day in Japan for three- and seven-year-old girls and three- and five-year-old boys, held annually on November 15 to celebrate the growth and well-being of young children. As it is not a national holiday, it is generally observed on the nearest weekend.

*Coming-of-Age Day(成人の日, Seijin no Hi) a Japanese holiday held annually on the second Monday of January. It is held in order to congratulate and encourage all those who have reached the age of majority (20 years old (二十歳, hatachi) over the past year, and to help them realize that they have become adults. Festivities include coming of age ceremonies (成人式, seijin-shiki) held at local and prefectural offices, as well as after-parties amongst family and friends.

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Source: totemo-kawaii--ne
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wade-wilsxn:

shieldsharksmile:

I don’t know how to not enjoy this picture.

this picture just made my life

wade-wilsxn:

shieldsharksmile:

I don’t know how to not enjoy this picture.

this picture just made my life

(via undiesofwondy)

Source: emmavvhite
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heroes-get-made:

For the anon who wants a whole post devoted to kittens and puppies, here you go!

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Nature/Animals Masterpost

***Disclaimer: Most of the images used do not belong to me. If you see one that’s yours, and you would like credit or to have it removed/replaced, please just ask.

Want your own Cheer Up Post? Find out how. Or see the others

(via indigirl94)

Source: heroes-get-made
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ucresearch:

Learn to code while playing Minecraft


Did you know that you can learn programming while playing a video game? A team of computer scientists at the University of California, San Diego, has developed LearnToMod, software that teaches kids introductory programming with Minecraft. Students will learn JavaScript, the essential programming language of the web, and can also earn University of California college credits, regardless of their age.

“Our goal is to teach kids computer science while they’re having fun.”

Read more about how UC San Diego computer scientists are teaching programming with Minecraft.

(via science-junkie)

Source: ucresearch
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"Shut the fuck up Udina"

- Every Mass Effect fan ever (via officialfemshep)

(via everythingmasseffect)

Source: vegavibes